Membrane-driven diamond anvil cell

High pressure mineralogy

Membrane-driven diamond anvil cell
Image: Prof. Dr. Falko Langenhorst

Our research activities in the area of high pressure mineralogy aim for a better understanding of the structure, composition and dynamics of the Earth interior. Projects include the study of natural high pressure minerals in metamorphic rocks from Earth mantle and the synthesis of mantle minerals in high pressure apparatus. Focal topics are diffusion in minerals, phase transformations, elements distributions and redox reactions.

Selected publications

Langenhorst, F., & Campione, M. (2019). Ideal and real structures of different forms of carbon, with some remarks on their geological significance. Journal of the Geological Society, 176(2), 337-347. https://doi.org/10.1144/jgs2018-056

Gleason, A. E., Bolme, C. A., Lee, H. J., Nagler, B., Galtier, E., Kraus, R. G., Sandberg, R., Yang, W., Langenhorst, F., & Mao, W. L. (2017). Time-resolved diffraction of shock-released SiO2 and diaplectic glass formation. Nature Communications, 8. https://doi.org/10.1038/s41467-017-01791-y

Malaspina, N., Langenhorst, F., Tumiati, S., Campione, M., Frezzotti, M. L., & Poli, S. (2017). The redox budget of crust-derived fluid phases at the slab-mantle interface. Geochimica Et Cosmochimica Acta, 209, 70-84. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.gca.2017.04.004

Fischer, R. A., Nakajima, Y., Campbell, A. J., Frost, D. J., Harries, D., Langenhorst, F., Miyajima, N., Pollok, K., & Rubie, D. C. (2015). High pressure metal-silicate partitioning of Ni, Co, V, Cr, Si, and O. Geochimica Et Cosmochimica Acta, 167, 177-194. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.gca.2015.06.026

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